The British Museum team busy installing a show-stopping 17-metre-long theatre curtain ahead of the opening of the MANGA Exhibition earlier this month. It was made by Japanese artist Kawanabe Kyōsai for the Shintomi Theatre on 30th June 1880. That day, after drinking a few bottles of rice wine, Kyōsai retreated to a studio and started painting. Just four hours later he emerged with the huge curtain, depicting members of the acting company as various kinds of monsters. The curtain is on loan from the Tsubouchi Memorial Theatre Museum, Waseda University. Photo: British Museum

British Museum’s massive MANGA exhibition opens this week

Author and manga expert Paul Gravett was lucky to be granted an exclusive sneak peek at The British Museum‘s MANGA exhibition, opening this week – and he’s very impressed. Announced last year, the exhibition, which will run until August, explores the phenomenon of manga and is the largest exhibition of the art ever to take placeContinue reading British Museum’s massive MANGA exhibition opens this week

The Black Iris by Russell Mark Olson

In Review: The Black Iris by Russell Mark Olson

By Russell Mark Olson Beginning life as an Inktober project last year, The Black Iris is a glorious film-in-a-book, rendered using only black India ink washes and a smattering of correction fluid. The book tells the story of the Black Iris, a World War Two resistance fighter and spy, on her attempt to smuggle plansContinue reading In Review: The Black Iris by Russell Mark Olson