Latest Commandos bring you War Dogs and Nazi Raiders!

Commando 4663

Here’s the details of the last of DC Thomson’s Commando titles of 2013, on sale from today, 19th December 2013, in all good newsagents and digitally for iPad and other mobile devices.

Commando No 4663 – The Eagles Return
Story: Ferg Handley Art: John Ridgway Cover: John Ridgway
Preview: www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/19th-december-2013-collection?issue=4663

It’s true that after 1066, no foreign power has successfully invaded Britain. Before that, though, things were different, as waves of foreign invaders rolled in over the seas.

The Romans were amongst the first to arrive, but when their Legions began to withdraw other warlike clans were quick to fill the power vacuum they left. Clans like the Saxons warriors who surged westwards in search of fresh conquests. It seemed the Eagles who did battle with the Romans would have to unsheathe their weapons afresh.

Commando 4664

Commando No 4664 – Hounds Of War
Originally Commando No 67 (May 1963)
Story: Eric Hebden Art: Boluda Cover: Ken Barr
Preview: www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/19th-december-2013-collection?issue=4664

Gruttenstein Castle – a name that sent shivers down men’s spines. Every field and valley around it was sown with mines and booby-traps. Guarding the castle were the most cold-blooded killer-troops that Germany could produce. Hidden inside it was the terrible “vengeance weapon” soon to be unleashed on its helpless victims…

… And up there in the secret control room, waiting, gloating, was the fiend who called himself “The Wolf of Gruttenstein”.

“There have been a fair few Commando stories over the years with animals as vital parts of the plot; almost characters if you like,” notes editor Calum Laird of this re-presented tale. “This was probably the first but it feels strangely contemporary as the dog’s nose is being used to sniff out explosives as they do today. As usual, the inventive Major Hebden weaves a lovely tale and draws a complex villain with a dual personality. No cardboard cut-outs here.

“Ken Barr’s slavering hounds set the scene and Boluda follows his lead with his strong black-and-whites. No ruff-ness there!

“That’s enough of my barking, get reading!”

Commando 4665

Commando No 4665 – Battle Of The Beams
Story: Alan Hebden Art: Carlos Pino (incorrectly credited as Manuel Benet) Cover: Carlos Pino (incorrectly credited as Manuel Benet)
Preview: www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/19th-december-2013-collection?issue=4665

During World War II, the battle for supremacy between the scientists of Britain and Germany was as furious as any at sea, on the ground or in the air.

When German advances in aircraft guidance gave their bombing raids brutal accuracy, young RAF Pilot Officer Clem Peterson and government scientist, “Doc” Smith, were just two of the men facing the task of neutralising the new system before enemy warplanes could bomb Britain to its knees. With their hands full, the last thing they needed was an inflexible Air Marshal unwilling to accept the need for progress… but that’s what they got.

“Our apologies go to Carlos Pino for incorrectly crediting him as fellow artist Manuel Benet on this story,” says deputy editor Scott Montgomery of an unusual glitch to this edition of Commando. “This was a genuine mistake, and an error that was not spotted until it was too late to correct.”

Commando 4666

Commando No 4666 – The Final Target
Originally Commando No 2190 (June 1988), re-issued as No 3644 (August 2003)
Story: Cyril Walker Art: Blasco Cover: Jeff Bevan
Preview: www.commandocomics.com/latest-issues/19th-december-2013-collection?issue=4666

A Nazi through and through, Hans Kruger was one of an elite squad of raiders led by his brother, Fritz. Infiltration and sabotage were their specialties, and they were prepared to fight to the last bullet, to die rather than fail to succeed.

They had to be stopped – somehow!

“This tough tale -with an unrelenting, murderously ruthless Nazi unit at its core- seems almost like a throwback to Commando’s gritty origins in the early 1960s,” says Scott Montgomery of this story. “Thankfully, though, it’s not all darkness – as we discover that there can be some honour and goodness on the battlefield and, on occasion, it can come from an unexpected source…

“So, kudos must go to the freelance contributors above, as well as the 1988 Commando editorial team, for creating this memorable book.”

There are more details of Commando on the official Commando website, the Commando Facebook page

DOWNTHETUBES EXCLUSIVE COMMANDO SUBSCRIPTION OFFER

If you’re looking for a Christmas gift for a British comics fan, downthetubes has an EXCLUSIVE discount on a subscription to DC Thomson’s Commando comic, simply by ordering through the DC Thomson Online Shop using our special discount code.

Follow this dedicated link to DC Thomson’s Commando subscription page

Some of our readers reported problems with the link recently, but the technical team at DC Thomson have now fixed things – so if you follow the link above, the discount is automatically applied – you do NOT need to enter the COMDT promotional code. Ignore the discount field on the check out page, too.

More information on our dedicated Commando Subscription Offer Page

The founder of downthetubes, John works as a comics editor, writer, as Creative Consultant on the Dan Dare audio adventures for B7 Media, and on promotional work for the Lakes International Comic Art Festival. Working in British comics publishing for over 30 years, his credits include editor of titles such as Doctor Who Magazine, Star Trek Magazine and Babylon 5 Magazine. He also edited the comics anthology STRIP Magazine and edited several audio comics for ROK Comics. He has also edited several comic collections, including volumes of “Charley’s War and “Dan Dare”. He’s the writer of “Crucible”, a creator-owned project with 2000AD artist Smuzz, published on Tapastic; and “Death Duty” and “Skow Dogs” with Dave Hailwood for digital comic 100% Biodegradable.



Categories: British Comics

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