Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, about 15 years ago. Photo courtesy Garth Ennis

Remembering Steve Dillon, by Garth Ennis

Preacher by Steve Dillon

Garth wrote this tribute to Steve Dillon, who died this weekend, for his Facebook page and it is reproduced here with his full permission. 

Steve liked a drink or two, and if the truth be told that’s how most of us knew him. Or it might be more accurate to say that Steve liked the pub, because that’s where you go to meet up with people, and Steve loved people. He found them endlessly interesting, he was happy to talk to anyone.

Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, about 15 years ago. Photo courtesy Garth Ennis
Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, about 15 years ago. Photo courtesy Garth Ennis

He changed my life in a couple of ways. The first was with a phone call, somewhere towards the end of ’91: “All right, mate, I’m thinking of heading over to New York in the new year, maybe for a long weekend. Fancy it?” The second was with two decades plus of brilliant artistic collaboration, where he took whatever lunacy I threw at him and made it work flawlessly, every single time.

We met in London in the summer of ’89, but it was about a year later in Dublin that something audibly clicked. After everyone else had passed out, we sat up ‘til dawn and killed off a bottle of Jameson, talking about what we wanted to do in comics- what we thought could be done with them, what the medium was for. I can recall a sort of mutual “Oh yes, you. You’re the one. You get it.” This was to pay off handsomely in the years to come.

The last time I saw Steve was late last Saturday night in New York, walking down fifth avenue to his hotel after saying goodnight outside Foley’s. It could have been the end of any one of a thousand nights. It’s not a bad last memory to have. Steve was best man at my wedding and my good and dear friend. I think he probably taught me more about what that word means than anyone else.

I drank with Steve Dillon from Dublin to Belfast, from London to Glasgow, from San Francisco to New York City. I have not one single complaint. Cheers, mate.

— Garth Ennis

Steve Dillon’s Facebook page is here

• See also: Comic creators remember Steve  Dillon, a true comics legend

• Steve’s family has asked that memorial donations be made to Hero Initiative. You can do so at this link

My apologies to Garth Ennis and Ra Khan for an incorrectly captioned photograph in an earlier version of this item, which may still be frequenting social media caches

Published by

John Freeman

The founder of downthetubes, John describes himself as is a "freelance comics operative", working as an editor, as Creative Consultant on the Dan Dare audio adventures for B7 Media, and on promotional work for the Lakes International Comic Art Festival. John has worked in British comics publishing for over 30 years. His credits include editor of titles such as Doctor Who Magazine at Marvel UK and Star Trek Magazine and Babylon 5 Magazine at Titan Magazines. He also edited STRIP Magazine and edited several audio comics for ROK Comics, including Team M.O.B.I.L.E. and The Beatles Story. He has also edited several comic collections, including volumes of “Charley’s War and “Dan Dare” for Tian Books. He’s the writer of “Crucible”, a creator-owned project with 2000AD artist Smuzz, published on Tapastic; and “Death Duty” and “Skow Dogs” with Dave Hailwood for digital comic 100% Biodegradable.

6 thoughts on “Remembering Steve Dillon, by Garth Ennis

  1. […] “The last time I saw Steve was late last Saturday night in New York, walking down fifth avenue to his hotel after saying goodnight outside Foley’s. It could have been the end of any one of a thousand nights. It’s not a bad last memory to have. Steve was best man at my wedding and my good and dear friend. I think he probably taught me more about what that word means than anyone else.”  Garth Ennis via Facebook & DownTheTubes […]

  2. […] Remembering Steve Dillon, by Garth Ennis downthetubes.net, Garth Ennis Den unerwarteten Tod von Preacher-Zeichner Steve Dillon mussten wir schon in den letzten Links der Woche beklagen. Ausführliche Rückblicke auf dessen Leben und Werk konnte ich bislang nicht finden, dafür meldeten sich zahlreiche Freunde und Kollegen auf Twitter und Facebook mit sehr persönlichen Erinnerungen an den Verstorbenen. Bleeding Cool hat viele davon zusammengetragen (Teil 1, Teil 2). Der oben verlinkte Abschiedstext stammt von Garth Ennis, jenem Autor, mit dem Dillon am meisten und am erfolgreichsten zusammenarbeitete. […]

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