In Review: Dan Dare at The Atkinson, Southport

Beware the Mekon! Photo: Dan Whitehead
Beware the Mekon! Photo: Dan Whitehead

Dan Whitehead visited The Atkinson in Southport, Merseyside – the town where Eagle comic was first created by Frank Hampson and Marcus Morris – and offers his take on the permanent Dan Dare exhibition there…

I have an almost lifelong affection for Dan Dare and Eagle. The comic was relaunched in the 1980s, just as I was ready to graduate from The Beano and I became an avid reader. I didn’t know it at the time, but not only did I share my birthplace in the North West seaside town Southport with the comic but also my birthday: Eagle was first published on 14th April in 1950, I followed along almost a quarter century later to the day.

Throw in my shared first name with its space-faring figurehead and it seems my fandom was predestined.

I knew that a bust of Dan Dare had been unveiled in the town to mark Eagle’s 50th anniversary, but I’m ashamed to say that despite years of returning to visit family, I never got round to making the trip into the town centre itself to see it in person.

With a family trip planned for Father’s Day this year, I resolved to rectify that oversight.

The Dan Dare bust created by John Fowler for the character's fifitieth anniversary, now at The Atkinson. Photo: Dan Whitehead
The Dan Dare bust created by John Fowler for the character’s fiftieth anniversary, now at The Atkinson. Photo: Dan Whitehead

The bust is now resident in The Atkinson museum and gallery, situated smack bang in the centre of Southport on the main tourist and shopping thoroughfare of Lord Street. Entry is free, and as well as the bust there’s a small but delightful exhibition of Eagle and Dan Dare memorabilia to go with it, part of “Between Land and Sea – 10,000 years of Sefton’s Coast” exhibit that also pays tribute to other famous Southport citizens such as Frank Hornby, the inventor of Meccano and Dinky Toys.

Everything relates to the original 1950s comic, and creator Frank Hampson and the original team that worked on the “Dan Dare” strip, since that was what was produced in Southport, in the Old Bakehouse studio in Churchtown. It’s doubtful that any devoted fans will discover anything new from the display, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t items to cherish.

Photo: Dan Whitehead
Photo: Dan Whitehead

An imposing life-sized Mekon figure is suspended over the display case, but your attention is drawn to what’s inside. The truly nostalgic will enjoy the range of Dan Dare toys and games, with lots of charming metal rayguns, plastic radio sets and even a vintage card game. There are books and comics, of course, including some French versions – quite a twist for anyone who thought Dare was a uniquely old school British celebrity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pg2aOuLzD5E

Original pages of Dan Dare art are an obvious attraction, and being able to the gorgeous  line work and airbrushed painting up close justified the entire trip as far as I was concerned. Even more thrilling is the inclusion of the spaceship models used to create the original strip, as well as masks and costumes  that Frank Hampson’s family and friends used to wear while modelling for the strip. (A small video screen on the wall features scenes from a British Pathe newsreel showing them actually being used).

It’s only one display case, but the collection has clearly been put together with real passion and  affection for Eagle, Dan Dare and Hampson himself.

Dan Dare dress up fun! Photo: Dan Whitehead
Dan Dare dress up fun! Photo: Dan Whitehead

Best of all, there’s a dressing up area nearby featuring a variety of costumes related to the museum’s exhibits. In among the Victorian clothes are two wonderfully accurate Dan Dare helmets and orange flight suits. A pull-out space scene backdrop completes the picture. It’s the sort of extra touch that really puts the cherry on top, and will definitely help parents to get their kids invested in the character.

Making a pilgrimage from the other side of the country just to see this collection probably isn’t terribly cost effective – even with free entry – but if you love classic British comics and happen to be in the Southport area, it is most definitely worth paying a visit.

• The Atkinson is at Lord Street, Southport PR8 1DB. The Museum and galleries are open Monday – Saturday 10.00am – 4.00pm, Sunday 11.00am – 4.00pm | Check all opening times here | Web: www.theatkinson.co.uk | Find The Atkinson on Facebook: TheAtkinson | Follow The Atkinson on Twitter @AtkinsonThe | Watch The Atkinson video channel on Youtube: AtkinsonThe

• There’s more about the original creation of the Dan Dare bust by John Fowler here on DanDare.org and the fiftieth anniversary art here on the official Frank Hampson web site, which also has a feature on the birth of Dan Dare and Eagle here

• The Old Bakehouse in Botanic Road, Churchtown, Southport – the original studio used by Frank Hampson and his team to produce the 1950’s Dan Dare strips – is not open to the public but has been recently restored

News Team

News Team

This account features guest posts by a wide variety of comics industry professionals, often cross posted with permission from their web sites. Our thanks to them for their support.

2 thoughts on “In Review: Dan Dare at The Atkinson, Southport

  • June 27, 2016 at 10:42 am
    Permalink

    A good article that is very complimentary about what I feel is a minimal display. Yes the Atkinson have presented the items in an excellent way but to me it seems very compact and should warrant a more prominent display. However this may be down to the limited space that they have available in the room where they do have other exhibition items. Several years ago I was lucky enough to see the Dan Dare exhibition when it was briefly in Manchester and they had reconstructed the room where DD and the Eagle comic was created with the items you can now see at the Atkinson, which made for a better experience. It is still worth dropping into the Atkinson Exhibition it you are in area and with Southport being a wonderful seaside town it’s worth making a day of it. Just a final pedantic point, Southport is no longer in Lancashire. It has been part of Merseyside since the early 70’s.

    • June 27, 2016 at 1:40 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks Paul – my mistake on Southport’s location, not Dan’s. Fixed now. I think we’d all love to see a bigger Comics Museum in the UK but given the space they have, The Atkinson has done a nice job.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: