Coming Soon, Daleks: The Ultimate Comic Strip Collection, a two-volume set, original art sought

Pitiless war machines committed to universal conquest, the Daleks have terrified and enthralled Doctor Who fans for generations, on screen, in books, and in comics – and now, Panini Comics, publishers of Doctor Who Magazine, are to release not one but two collections of strips featured in the long-running publication.

The first volume of Dalek stories taken from Doctor Who Magazine’s 40 years of award-winning comic strip will be published in October, and the second in December – and the editorial team are currently trying to track down original art from two stories for this follow-up collection.

The first volume will include “The Return of the Daleks” (the back up strip from Doctor Who Weekly Issues 1 – 4); “Abslom Daak – Dalek Killer” (Doctor Who Weekly Issues 17 – 20); “Star Tigers” (Doctor Who Weekly Issues 27 – 30, Doctor Who Monthly Issues 44 – 46); “The Dogs of Doom” (Doctor Who Weekly Issues 27 – 34); “Nemesis of the Daleks” (Doctor Who Magazine Issues 152 – 155); and
“Metamorphosis”, from the Doctor Who Year Book 1993).

(Daleks versus the Martians & The Daleks: Return of the Elders are the two strips that they are still seeking artwork from.)

“For the second volume, there’s a couple of strips we haven’t yet digitised,” editor Ed Hammond tells downthetubes, “and we want to spread the word among art collectors to see if anyone still has the original artwork which we could possibly scan.”

“For the second volume, there’s a couple of strips we haven’t yet digitised and wondered if you might be able to spread the word among art collectors to see if anyone still has the original artwork which we could possibly scan?”

The first episode of “The Daleks – Return of the Elders” from Doctor Who Magazine Issue 249, by John Lawrence and Ron Turner

The strips in question are “Daleks Versus the Martians”, from the Doctor Who Spring Special 1996, written by Alan Barnes with art by Lee Sullivan, featuring “Doctor Who” played by Peter Cushing in the feature films; and “The Daleks – Return of the Elders”, first published in Doctor Who Magazine Issues 249-254, written by John Lawrence, with art by Ron Turner.

Alongside these stories, the second volume is expected to include “Bringer of Darkness” (Doctor Who Magazine Summer Special 1993); “Emperor of the Daleks” (DWM Issues 197 – 202); “Fire and Brimstone” (DWM Issues 251 – 255); and “Children of the Revolution” (DWM Issues 312 – 317).

If you can help, contact downthetubes via our editorial email, and we will pass messages on, thank you!

Pre-order the Daleks: The Ultimate Comic Strip Collection Volume One from AmazonUK (Affiliate Link)

Publisher‏: ‎ Panini Books (1 Oct. 2022)
Language: ‎ English
Paperback: ‎ 164 pages
ISBN-10: ‎ 1804910597
ISBN-13: ‎ 978-1804910597

UPDATE: Artist Lee Sullivan has stepped up to the plate, as ever, and is helping Panini fill some art gaps!

The founder of downthetubes, John works as a comics editor, writer, as Creative Consultant on the Dan Dare audio adventures for B7 Media, and on promotional work for the Lakes International Comic Art Festival. Working in British comics publishing for over 30 years, his credits include editor of titles such as Doctor Who Magazine, Star Trek Magazine and Babylon 5 Magazine. He also edited the comics anthology STRIP Magazine and edited several audio comics for ROK Comics. He has also edited several comic collections, including volumes of “Charley’s War and “Dan Dare”. He’s the writer of “Crucible”, a creator-owned project with 2000AD artist Smuzz, published on Tapastic; and “Death Duty” and “Skow Dogs” with Dave Hailwood for digital comic 100% Biodegradable.



Categories: British Comics, British Comics - Collections, Comics, Doctor Who, downthetubes Comics News, downthetubes News, Other Worlds, Television

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5 replies

  1. Will this collection re-print the strips from the “Daleks” album that Panini released a few years ago?

    • No – these collections only feature the Dalek strips from Doctor Who Magazine in its various regenerations. DWM editor Marcus Hearn has previously said that he’d love to do collections of pre-DWM strips, from TV Comic, Countdown, and TV Action; but these are dependent on sourcing artwork known to have survived, if possible, as well as scans from good quality issues of the titles. The amount of surviving original art from “The Daleks” used for the most recent collection really is pretty incredible, as much commercial comic art has, sadly, simply been destroyed down the years. It took a long time to gather that surviving art.

  2. Definitely interested in this, expensive though, even now they dropped price £20 > £17.60.

    Probably wait for second hand copy, just too much money for me.

    Wonder if it’s inflation of just milking well off older generation who fans. Anything Tom baker / Who that generation loved always seems marked up.

    I like to support artists but this just is too much for me.

    • I doubt any publisher wants to “milk” the fans, James. While they need to make a profit they also don’t want to put readers off. Rising prices of paper, printing, delivery etc will account for book price increases. As Doctor Who is a niche market they know the books aren’t going to sell in the numbers of, for example, the latest Jack Reacher novel, so prices will reflect the lower print runs. Panini’s book prices are around the same as Rebellion’s for a similar format.

      • Thanks for reply Lew. Much respect to you and your work over the years.

        Well a lot Business aren’t as logical as you make out and don’t seem to care about customers or even their own future. The current business method for many firms seems get dividends out as much as can right now, screw workers to make the dividends, build firm with debt and as little investment as can, and who cares about tomorrow we’ll have left the country for our holiday homes. They have learnt from our politicians how to behave short term only.

        With regards to Who one company makes me laugh is Big Finish. I love there stuff and really don’t mind paying a good price for it. But the sheer volume of content they produce is crazy. There’s not enough hours in a life to listen to half there stuff, unless you are such a Who fanatic you listen to it in the shower and whilst asleep and are retired with no grandkids or other hobbies. They have diluted the rarity pleasure of Who in flooding content. Content that they can’t develop with depth because they can’t take the Who character any where. I don’t know what profits they make but it’s hard to not think they might be exploiting hardcore Who fans just a little. The original Marvel studios you may say.

        I don’t believe Who is such a nice market, the worlds full of niche markets anyway, that’s my point there is so much competition for my time these days as well as my money. Publishers are their own worst enemy flooding the market with volume and then being surprised when people complain about price. Netflix / Streamers are a prime example of this. The number of books / computer games etc people buy but never read / play is very very high. When people realize this as we now face tough economic times firms will struggle more than they realize yet.

        What I notice with some of these comics is that sellers buy lots of copies for whatever discount they get and then sell as new for a cheaper price even days after release on amazon. As with games consoles, sneakers, food etc, many layers of sellers seem to be building up.

        Rant over 😛

        Here’s a question where are the third doctor media?

        First Doctor gets lots of media for well being first.

        Second gets a little because he was funny little comic doctor.

        Fourth tons of stuff because that was the most popular with that generation.

        Third doctor one Comic book in modern times – sad 🙁

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