British Comic Reference | British Comic Characters Profiled | Garth

Early Garth
Early Garth

Garth was the brainchild of strip cartoonist and writer Stephen Dowling and BBC producer Gordon Boshell. Both were working on the British national newspaper the Daily Mirror and were asked to create a new strip by its editor. The pair came up with the concept of a “strong man” strip, loosely modelled on DC Comics superhero Superman and the first daily strip appeared int he Mirror on Saturday 24th July 1943.

As a small child the man who would become Garth was washed ashore in the Shetlands in a tiny coracle. Pulled out of the sea by an elderly couple who then adopted him, Garth grew up to be incredibly strong. He became a Navy Captain, but his boat was torpedoed and the shipwrecked Garth was washed up from the sea on a wooden raft, amnesiac from his experiences, coming to land on a small island. There. he is discovered by Gala, a native girl, who introduces him to her people, and who he later saves from a despotic tyrant.

In “The 7 Ages of Garth”, we discovered Garth could relive his past incarnations – effectively travelling through time and space.

In the 1970s story “Journey into Fear” it was revealed Garth had extra-terrestrial origins. His great-grand father, Space Exploration Commander Wolfen from the planet Saturnis, fell in love with an Earth woman and Garth was the result of their relationship.

Recurring Characters

Garth
First Appearance: “Garth”

Garth by Frank Bellamy
Garth by Frank Bellamy

As a small child the man who would become Garth was washed ashore in the Shetlands in a tiny coracle (this origin not revealed in “The Saga of Garth”). Pulled out of the sea by an elderly couple who then adopted him, Garth grew up to be incredibly strong. He became a Navy Captain, but his boat was torpedoed and the shipwrecked Garth was washed up from the sea on a wooden raft, amnesiac from his experiences, coming to land on a small island. There, he is discovered by Gala, a native girl, who introduces him to her people, and who he later saves from a despotic tyrant.

In “The 7 Ages of Garth”, we discovered Garth could relive his pat incarnations – effectively travelling through time and space.

In the 1970s story “Journey into Fear” it was revealed Garth had extra-terrestrial origins. His great-grand father, Space Exploration Commander Wolfen from the planet Saturnis, fell in love with an Earth woman and Garth was the result of their relationship.

Professor Jules Lumiere
First Appearance: The 7 Ages of Garth

Professor Lumiere is Garth’s friend and mentor, who psycho-analysed Garth and took him back through his previous incarnations in “The 7 Ages of Garth” – the first instance of Garth travelling through time and space.

Astra

Garth’s true love Astra is the last of a race of ancient god-like entities dating back to ancient civilisations some 5000 years ago who had conquered the natural world and were virtually eternal – but who could not let emotions like love take hold of them, for fear of being turned to evil. A number of stories feature Astra (known to the Romans as the goddess Venus). Her nemesis is Baal, the fallen Apollo who has aligned himself with the Dark Forces of Nature.

Baal

One thing the immortals Garth encounters could not do was fall in love, because it drove them mad. Baal became evil after his mortal sweetheart had died.

Madam Voss

Madam Voss used a machine to exchange brains between bodies. Her brain ended up in Garth’s body and his in her body, but eventually Garth managed to restore his mind to his own body. She would return to battle him on a number of occasions.

Creators

Listed alphabetically

Angus Allan – Writer

John Allard – Artist

Martin Asbury – Artist

Frank Bellamy – Artist

Gordon Boshell – Co-creator

Steve Dowling – Co-creator and Artist

Jim Edgar – Writer

Don Freeman – Writer

Dick Hailstone – Artist

Philip Harbottle – Writer

Hugh McClelland – Writer

Peter O’Donnell – Writer

Peter O’Donnell (11th April 1920 – 3rd May 2010) ) is best known for his other newspaper strip creation Modesty Blaise, but he also wrote a number of Garth stories, beginning with “Warriors of Krull” in 1953 through to “The Invaders”, which ended its run in April 1966.

“In 1953, I got a call from Juilian Phipps, who was Strip Cartoon Editor at the Daily Mirror,” he recalled for an article on the official Modesty Blaise web site documenting his strip work. “In those days the Mirror ran a full page of strips. One was called ‘Belinda’, a pinch from the American ‘Orphan Annie’. The writer had gone sick in the middle of a story and they asked me to keep Belinda going.

“They liked my work on ‘Belinda’ and asked me to take over another strip, ‘Garth’. I agreed and scripted ‘Garth’ as a freelance writer for the next thirteen years.

“The Garth stories are fantasy adventures about a very strong man whose best friend is a scientist, Professor Lumiere. In the stories, Garth can go back into the past or anywhere in the universe. When I took it over, Garth had two girlfriends. They did nothing for the stories, so I got rid of them. Then, a couple of years later, I thought I should give him a lady, but no ordinary lady would have been big enough for it. So I invented a goddess, Astra. She appeared in what I consider to be the best Garth story I wrote, ‘The Last Goddess’.”

Web Links

The Official Modesty Blaise web site

Peter O’Donnell: Wikipedia Entry

Obituary: the Daily Telegraph

Obituary: the New York Times

Tim Quinn – Writer

James Tomlinson – Writer

Ken Roscoe – Writer

Peter Tranter – Writer

Collections

In spite of the acclaimed talent that worked on the strip, until the Noughties just five official dedicated Garth books have appeared over the years; a flip book (with Romeo Jones on the reverse) in horizontal format in the late 1950s or early 1960s; The Daily Mirror Book of Garth (1975; a softback annual with Frank Bellamy art which had topless girls censored/bikini tops added, and also in 1976; a horizontal format, Frank Bellamy art uncensored, nipples aplenty) and two Titan Books collection in the late 1980s, Cloud of Balthus and Women of Galba.

John Dakin also reprinted some great Steve Dowling/John Allard/Frank Bellamy complete strip collections in the 1970s.

Revivals

Since the end of the strip’s final original run with “The Z-File” in 1997, there have been numerous attempts to revive the character, some more widely known than others.

Artist Huw-J brought Garth back in 2008, but the Mirror only published the strip online.

John Higgins has also worked on a revival of the character.

In 2014, Ivo Milicevic, publisher of the short-lived STRIP Magazine, approached the Mirror with the aim of producing new Garth strips that would serve to both promote his anthology title. Utilising some story ideas from John Freeman, he write his own plot and commissioned Italian artist Marco Turini to draw the strip. The project fell foul of disagreement and remains another failed attempt to revive the series.

Garth - Character study by Marco Turini
Garth – Character study by Marco Turini

Most recently, in 2015 Ant Jones and Bill Storie began an all-new Garth story set after the final original take “The Z-File”, published with the permission of the Mirror on the strip’s official Facebook page. We ran a news story on the project here.

The Z-File 2: Inferno! Episode One, written and drawn by Bill Storie, coloured by Ant Jones
The Z-File 2: Inferno! Episode One, written and drawn by Bill Storie, coloured by Ant Jones

Spaceship Away Issue 32, published in 2014, features an article by Ant Jones and Claire Barnes on “lost” Garth adventures. Back issues are available here. Spaceship Away also published a number of Garth reprints, re-mastered by John Ridgway.

Web Links

On downthetubes

Garth: Strip Checklist

Originally compiled by Geoffrey Wren and Ann Holmes, the site on which this first appeared is now only available through web archive sites. In 2015, John Freeman, Ant Jones, former Garth writer Philip Harbottle and others utilised the list to create a Garth Wiki, which updated and corrected that list and includes past story outlines and more. I’ve now added that list to downthetubes here.

Garth was published in Norway: there is a checklist detailing that run here

External Sites

Garth on the Mirror web site

Reprints of the strip feature in the Mirror to this day, coloured by Martin Baines. Contributors down the years included Frank Bellamy while Peter O’Donnell of Modesty Blaise fame contributed some stories.

The Return of Garth (2008)

In August 2008, after a long gestation period, adventure hero Garth returned to British newspaper The Mirror  in a new adventure. Artist Huw-J talked to John Freeman about the new strip and his many plans for the character’s ongoing revival…

• Garth Reborn (2015)

In 2015 Ant Jones and Bill Storie began an all-new Garth story set after the final original take “The Z-File”, published with the permission of the Mirror on the strip’s official Facebook page. We ran a news story on the project here.

International Hero “Garth” Entry

• Yesterday’s Papers: A Daily Mirror comic strip list

A guide to all the newspaper strips published in the Mirror, including Garth

• The All Devon Comic Collectors Club

An offshoot of the old South West CCC, the ADCCC, which closed its doors in 2016, was mainly centred on the Exeter area, searching for prime quality images for the (complete) British story booklets that is their raison d’etre.

The desire of elder members to see old newspaper strips again, linked with the poor quality of the yellowing photocopies that were doing the rounds, provided the impetus for the club to decide to track down and reprint ‘lost’ Garth strips. A search for other British titles naturally followed, including good quality prints of Romeo Brown, Paul Temple etc.

The closure of the ADCCC and the Newspaper Daily Comic Strip Library was announced in January 2016 after Paul was diagnosed with a terminal illness.

There is more information about the work of the club here on downthetubes

2 thoughts on “British Comic Reference | British Comic Characters Profiled | Garth

  • December 19, 2014 at 2:32 am
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    Where on earth can I buy Garth Comics?

    Reply
    • December 19, 2014 at 9:22 am
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      Some of the Australian albums occasionally turn up on eBay or in the four-times-a-year auctions at CompalComics. You might also want to contact the All Devon Collectors Clubinfo here. They may have back issues of their limited edition magazines collecting the strips. Colour versions of some Garth strips have also appeared in past issues of Spaceship Away. “The Bubble Man”, coloured by John Ridgway, featured in Issues 19 -23; and “The Finality Factor”, drawn by Martin Asbury with colour by Tim Booth featured in Issues 24 – 30.

      Reply

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